HORSE  FUN

"The most wasted of all days is one without laughter."
- E.E. Cummings


 
2014 Archives   Jan    Feb   Mar   Apr    May   June   
Updated  06/30/2014
 

         Jim Key, the "Smartest Horse in the World"
                            www.BeautifulJimKey.com

Trained with only kindness and patience by self-taught veterinarian “Dr.” William Key, Jim was an educated horse, whose abilities to read, spell, do math, and more, made him more valuable than any racehorse of his time.

  
"Doc Key", an ex-slave, Civil War veteran, horse whisperer, entrepreneur, perhaps the most famous African-American of his day, and Jim became the number one box office star in the nation - energizing the worldwide animal welfare movement, making the phrase “be kind to animals” a household ideal.

Star attraction at 1904
World's Fair in
St. Louis, MO








 
 

 Gala of the Royal Horses - Video

The Royal horses of Europe are some of the most celebrated in history, favored and revered for centuries by royalty, equestrian riders, and bullfighters for their athleticism and grace.  "The unique qualities of the Royal Horses single them out from all other breeds in the Equine world. Their physical beauty and grace, coupled with exceptional courage and nobility make them an object of admiration and a source of inspiration for horse lovers everywhere," says riding Master Rene Gasser, creator and producer of the "Gala of the Royal Horses" show touring North America in 2014.  The Gala of The Royal Horses features Andalusian, Friesian, Lipizzaner and Arabian breeds.  It is dedicated to showing off the amazing beauty and maneuvers these horses are capable of including the stunning maneuvers once used on the battlefield now known as "The Airs Above The Ground".

The Real Horse Vocabulary:  L to Z
(Horse Vocabulary A to K was posted in June)

Lameness - The condition of most riders after the first few rides each year; can be a chronic condition in weekend riders.

Lead Rope - A long apparatus instrumental in the administration of rope burns. Also used by excited horses to take a handler for a drag.

Longeing - A training method a horse uses on its owner with the purpose of making the owner spin in circles-rendering the owner dizzy and light-headed so that they get sick and pass out, so the horse can go back to grazing.

Manure spreader - Horse traders

Mosquitoes
- Radar equipped blood sucking insects that typically reach the size of small birds.

Overreaching - A descriptive term used to explain the condition your credit cards are in by the end of show season.

Pinto - A colorful (usually green) coat pattern found on a freshly washed and sparkling clean grey horse that was left unattended in his stall for ten minutes.

Pony - The true size of the stallion that you bred your mare to via transported semen-that was advertised as 15 hands tall.

Proud Flesh - The external reproductive organs flaunted by a stallion when a horse of any gender is present. Often displayed in halter classes.

Quarter Cracks - The comments that most Arabian owners make about the people who own Quarter Horses.

Quittor - A term trainers have commonly used to refer to their clients who come to their senses and pull horses out of their barns.

Race - What your heart does when you see the vet bill.

Rasp - An abrasive, long, flat metal tool used to remove excess skin from the knuckles.

Reins - Break-away leather device used to tie horses.

Ringworms - Spectators who block your view and gather around the rail sides at horse shows.

Sacking out - A condition caused by Sleeping Sickness (see below). The state of deep sleep a mare owner will be in at the time a mare actually goes into labor and foals.

Saddle - An expensive leather contraption manufactured to give the rider a false sense of security. Comes in many styles, all feature built-in ejector seats.

Saddle Sore
- The way the rider's bottom feels the morning after the weekend at the horse show.

Sleeping Sickness - A disease peculiar to mare owners while waiting for their mares to foal. Caused by nights of lost sleep, symptoms include irritability, red baggy eyes and a zombie-like waking state. Can last several weeks.

Splint - An apparatus that can be applied to various body parts of a rider due to the parting of the ways of a horse and his passenger.

Stall - What your truck does on the way to a horse show, fifty miles from the closest town.

Tack Room - A room where every item necessary to work with or train your horse has been put, in a place which it cannot be found in less than 30 minutes.

Twisted Gut - The feeling deep inside that most riders get before their classes at a show.

Versatility - An owners ability to shovel manure, fix fences and chase down a loose horse in one afternoon.

Vet Catalog - An illustrated brochure provided to stable owners that features a wide array of products that are currently out of stock or have been dropped from a company's inventory.

Weaving - The movement a horse trailer makes while going down the road with a rambunctious horse in it.

Whip Marks - The tell-tale raised welts on the face of a rider-caused by the trail rider directly in front of you letting a low hanging branch go.

Windpuffs - Stallion owners. Also applied to used car salesmen.

Withers - The reason you'll seldom see a man riding bareback.

Yearling - the age at which all horses completely forget the things you taught them previously.

Youngstock - A general term used for all equines old enough to bite, kick or run you over, but not yet old enough to dump you on the ground.

Zoo - The typical atmosphere around most horse farms.

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